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Overview


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Overview


 

Hometown

Reidsville, NC

Resides

New York, NY

 

Ensembles

The Parhelion Trio

Delphi Chamber Orchestra

 

Affiliation

College of Staten Island, CUNY

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Degrees

D.M.A. The Graduate Center, CUNY

M.M. Mannes College The New School for Music

B.M. Mannes College The New School for Music

H.S. North Carolina School of the Arts

American clarinetist, Ashleé Miller, has been praised for her rich “color and imagination” [NPR]. Winner of the 2005 North Carolina Soloist competition, Dr. Miller made her solo debut at the age of sixteen with the North Carolina Symphony on their opening tour. She was the first clarinetist to receive the Jack Kent Cooke Young Artist award, which includes: a $10,000 career grant, a performance on NPR’s “From the Top,” and a community art project sponsored by NPR. She has been featured on WDAV’s “In Person” and her performances have appeared on radio stations throughout the country. Dr. Miller was a featured performer in the Young Musician’s Forum recital series and has appeared as a guest artist with the Elysium Ensemble and Alaria Trio at Carnegie Hall.

Dr. Miller is currently a member of The Parhelion Trio, a recent semi-finalist and prize-winner at the inaugural M-Prize International chamber music competition. Their performances include appearances in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s performing arts series “ETHEL and Friends,” Weill Recital at Carnegie Hall, and a solo recital during the inaugural season of National Sawdust. In June, the trio was a featured guest ensemble, alongside members of the Emerson String Quartet, at the New Music for Strings Festival hosted by Stony Brook University and The Royal Academy of Music (Aarhus, DE). As a member of the Flute Clarinet Duo Consortium, Parhelion recently co-commissioned a new work by internationally renowned composer Pierre Jalbert and performed at the Consortium's Retrospective concert at the National Flute Convention in Minneapolis. Earlier this year, Parhelion was a guest ensemble at Adelphi University to give performances and master-classes to performers and composers throughout the year. 

Dr. Miller’s performance career is accentuated by many diverse performances and cross-disciplinary projects that lie outside of classical music. Last year, she performed at Le Poisson Rouge as part of the Song Writer’s Orchestra, which features new compositions by rock and pop artists. In 2015, she partnered with Paul David Young, winner of the Kennedy Center’s 2009 Paula Vogel Playwrighting Award, to write an instrumental score for his new play, Kentucky Cantata.  In her musical compositions, Dr. Miller incorporates an innovative style of performance practice to allow musical materials to interlace freely within the natural flow and rhythm of speech—a practice stemming from her research in human entrainment and temporal processes in music. The project received 16 performances at HERE Arts Center in SoHo and was praised by Broadway critic Howard Miller.

Aside from performing, Dr. Miller teaches a private studio of thirty musicians and occasionally demonstrates clarinet in the New York Philharmonic’s “Young People’s Concerts” and “Very Young People’s Concerts” KidZones. She is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the City University of New York.

Dr. Miller is the former principal of the New York Youth Symphony and member of the Mannes Orchestra. She has held fellowships at the Bowdoin International Music festival and Sarasota Music Festival, and is an alumna of the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. She received her high school diploma with a concentration in music from the University of the North Carolina School of the Arts and was awarded her Bachelor and Master Degrees from Mannes College of Music, graduating as student speaker, winning honors and the Lotte Pulvermacher-Egers Humanities Award. She received her Doctorate of Musical Arts from The Graduate Center CUNY with a dissertation on Charles Ives. Dr. Miller studied with legendary clarinetist Charles Neidich.